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Types of Decorative Glass

  • Posted by:
  • Admin
  • Tags:
  • stained glass, etched glass, textured glass
  • Posted date:
  • 15-07-2019
Types of Decorative Glass

Glass has been used as decoration since thousands of years ago, including evidence of early mirrors made from obsidian, a naturally formed volcanic glass. In modern times, glass has a wide range of applications, from glassware to jewellery and of course, glazing.

Though plain glass panels are clean and used most often, there are also a wide variety of decorative glass panels which can add an extra layer of depth to the design of a door or window. The following methods can be applied to both residential and commercial properties, and are flexible to suit a wide variety of design styles.


Stained Glass

Perhaps the most well-known form of decorative glass, stained glass windows became hugely popular in the Medieval times as they can be used to depict elaborate biblical scenes in churches and cathedrals. 

Outside of religious buildings, the design of stained glass is hugely flexible; from landscapes to decorative patterns, there are virtually no limits to the design.


Brilliant Cut Glass

Brilliant cut glass is a wonderful way of embellishing a glass panel with a pattern. 

This process was developed in Victorian times and was often used to decorate doors and windows of pubs, along with other decorative techniques such as etching. 

A specialist cutting wheel is used to cut grooves into the glass, forming elegant patterns.


Etched Glass

Etched glass can be crafted in several ways; traditional acid etching is a process which involves a using a strong chemical to erode the surface of the glass to create a frosted appearance, which can be manipulated to create intricate patterns. 

Frosted glass can also be made by blasting the surface with sand.


Textured Glass

As the name suggests, textured glass is glass panels which have been engraved with a decorative pattern which is both aesthetically pleasing and practical. 

From the pattern of falling rain to organised geometric shapes, the pattern often serves to obscure the view and protect privacy.


Fused Glass

Though this is rarely used as a single piece of glazing, it can be used with other techniques to create a decorative glazing unit, such as a small fused glass panel in a stained glass window. 

Fused glass can also be used to create ornamental pieces such as coasters and bowls.